F*ck It Friday

Some of my all-time BEST memories of sports and team practices are the days when things went unplanned. When the team just wasn’t feelin’ it that day, and the coach read our cues and allowed us to play. Even in CrossFit, many of my fondest memories with my clients and teammates are the days when we did a WOD completely off the top of our heads.

While routines and regimes are important, and consistency is key in anything we want results in, it is just as important to have free days and play.

“We don’t stop playing because we grow old; We grow old because we stop playing.”

This morning, I was reminded of this again by my 6:00am class. As the clients rolled in between 5:40 and 6:00am, one-by-one they trickled over to the Northside of our gym (We have two rooms connected by a gate, and the main room is for class, while the Northside is for extra curricular activities).

I realized that no one was intending on doing today’s programmed WOD, so I walked over to the Northside and joined them. As a coach, I was reading the cues, they all just wanted to be together in a free-range environment today.

At the end of the day, we all want the same thing - To break a good sweat and have a little fun for one hour before we have to go back out in the Jungle of Life and adult so hard again!

Most of the time, we do the programming. Every once in awhile, though, it’s nice to break routine and have a little free time.

It is few and far between, but the days when it happens, like today, when it works out that all of us are feelin’ the Northside and end up doing a lot of work while at the same time having a great time - It’s pure magic!

I loved that hour with the 6:00am crew - We all needed that hour. Some of them did a strength set together, while others did a fun chipper I gave them, and everyone was smiling and left that morning satisfied and happy. Fulfilled. It filled my heart as a coach.

Sometimes… It’s okay to say “F*ck it,” and have a free day.

F*ck It Friday today! I think we should have them every other Friday, or at least once a month.

Work hard. Play harder. Love hardest.

Kara PurvesComment
HAMMY Bar Crawl

Join us on Saturday, May 18, 2019 @ 4:00 - 11:00pm, for a bar crawl to kick off The 2019 HAMMY + Hometown Hero 5K festivities!

The crawl will begin at MadCap Brew Co. and continue to Barflyy, Panini's Bar & Grill, The Loft, The Zephyr Pub, Ray's Place Kent and Venice Cafe!

Individuals 21+ are encouraged to contribute a $10 donation to participate in the crawl. With your donation at MadCap, you will receive a t-shirt (first come, first served) and you will be entered into a drawing for some fun prizes!

We'd also love it if you joined us for The HAMMY & 5K Run on June 1, 2019!

About The HAMMY:

The HAMMY is an annual event brought to you by CrossFit Cadre to celebrate the life of Adam S. Hamilton. The event is on June 1, 2019, at the Kent State Dix Field House.

This year, more than 1,000 spectators, participants, runners, and walkers are anticipated to attend.

Visit www.thehammy.org for more details and to sign up!

Kara PurvesComment
Gimme Some Sugar!

Have you heard about SugarWOD yet?!

It’s an awesome app we are using at CrossFit Cadre to keep track of all of our lifts and workouts so we have a record to go back to when needed. It’s also a great way for all of us at Cadre to cheer each other (We can give each other “Fist Bumps” and share comments), stay accountable, and provide support for each other.

Check it out here: https://www.sugarwod.com/

Just download the app on your smartphone, make yourself a Profile, and be sure to Join “CrossFit Cadre” to get the workouts each day and log in your results. From there, you can check out our gym’s Leaderboard, give “fist bumps” and words of encouragement, and even some friendly banter. ;-)

Download the App, “SugarWOD”

Make your Profile

Join our Gym, “CrossFit Cadre”

Each day you show up for the WOD, be sure to log in your results and give some love to the others!

If you have any questions or trouble with the app, just ask one of us awesome coaches. ;-)

Kara PurvesComment
Register for The Hammy & 5K

TO REGISTER for The Hammy WOD, click on the link below:

https://crossfitcadre.redpodium.com/the-hammy-2019

The HAMMY

  • Row 1,000 Meters

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks
    (135 lbs. Men / 95 lbs Women)

  • 50 Push ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Sit ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Box Hops
    (24" Box Men / 20" Box Women)

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Pull Ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • Run 1000 Meters

*All Movements can be scaled, modified, and adapted for anyone, just let us know!

Individual:  Athletes (12 years and older) take on the workout as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

Teams of Two:  Athletes (Female/Male, Male/Male or Female/Female) split the workout with a partner as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

____________________________________________________________________________________

TO REGISTER for the 5K Run, click on the link below:

https://crossfitcadre.redpodium.com/2019-hometown-hero-5k

Kara PurvesComment
CommUNITY Cheer

There is a culture I’d like to build upon with y’all, and it takes ALL of us to enhance it and then maintain.

We talk about our Cadre commUNITY, and we certainly are fond of each other since we all keep coming back each day! ;-) There is one element to our commUNITY that I would like to discuss and then level up together - Going back for each other and cheering each other on in the workouts!

No one left behind. No one finishes alone. All in together.

Now, I know that this can sometimes be awkward. Sometimes we don’t know what we should do to cheer someone on. Do we clap? Yell? Stand in front of them or to the side? Do we countdown for them? Should we do the last few reps with them? Do they just want to be left alone?

The trick to cheering each other on, especially the ones in the back and the newbies, is to NOT come across as condescending or pitying. No one wants a “charity cheer.”

Okay, so how do we support each other through the workouts?!

Take 5 seconds within the workout to recognize a fellow classmate, especially those who you are not as close to or maybe don’t know as well yet. Give ‘em a fist bump, high five, or shout out some encouraging words. While we are all in the pain cave together, it’s nice to get a surprise cheer from a fellow teammate.

If it’s a workout that is “For Time,” and you are one of the first ones to finish, catch your breath, and then go back for the others. Count out loud the next set for someone. Give someone a countdown in rest time to keep them moving. Join in with a buddy and do the last 10 burpees with him. And, stand or kneel to the side of someone, never stand directly in front of them.

You don’t have to cheer with over-exaggerated enthusiasm. You don’t have to have the “right words.” Don’t be fake. Give genuine support in whatever capacity you can.

One thing NOT to do, though… Stand to the side of an athlete and say absolutely nothing. Now THAT, my friends, is really awkward, and definitely not motivating to the person struggling to finish. Also, don’t crowd around or circle an athlete - While well-intended, for that athlete in the middle it’s extremely uncomfortable being the center of attention like that, and can even be embarrassing. One of the only times we should crowd an athlete is if she’s attempting her first ring muscle up, or he’s going for a new PR in his back squat.

If we’re a big class, and there’s still one more person left finishing the workout, we’re all better off joining in with her and doing the remaining reps she has left WITH her. You get some bonus reps in, and she gets the support she needs, while not being isolated or spotlighted.

At the end of the day, we are all in this together, and we’re just trying to get fit, gosh darn it. There’s also a reason why we all joined a gym - We don’t want to do this sh** alone!

And, from the receiving end of support (And, I have been there many times), I can tell you that at first it can bruise the ego a bit having someone come back for you and finish with you. It’s hard to accept support like that, because it’s also a reminder of how much you think you suck. But, my friends, we need to put our egos aside and remember that our teammates are coming back for us because they care and they want us to succeed. Often they even want us to succeed MORE than themselves. Always remember that!

So, from here on out, my friends:

  • High-five and fist bump right before the WOD starts to spark each others’ energy!

  • Shout out and cheer each other on during the WOD. Even throw in some friendly competition, if appropriate with your friend

  • If you finish first, go back for the all the others, and keep cheering and supporting until the last one is done

  • If it’s an AMRAP or controlled time domain, then after the WOD make the effort to high five every single person in class

  • When in doubt, join in and do the reps with them!

Workouts are always better together! And, they are especially better when we’re all lifting each other up throughout the process! ;-)

Cheer on!

Kara PurvesComment
All Of It For Nothing

Yesterday, I had a classic parenting moment with my almost 7-year old daughter, Bailey. In the morning, she helped her father clean out the minivan and organize the garage. Then, she had a soccer game. Afterwards, she helped in the front yard digging out weeds, and then she came inside and helped me with our mountains of laundry. She even put away both of her little sisters’ clothes. For dinner, she set up the table for everyone, and all was good in the neighborhood. Bailey was beyond helpful that day, and we appreciated it (And, it was all with no whining or complaining, believe it or not!).

After everyone finished dinner, my husband asked the girls to help with the dishes. Our house rule is that whoever cooks does not clean, and everyone else helps out. My husband added in an incentive, “After you two help me with the dishes, then we can enjoy a brownie for dessert! Deal?” To which the happily willing children responded, “YES!”

But… Although Bailey agreed to the deal, she suddenly walked away from the kitchen and decided to read a book instead on the couch. In any other situation, this would be a wonderful alternative, of course, but she left her father high and dry. When it came time for dessert, we told her she couldn’t have one.

To an almost 7-year old, this was obviously an extremely unfair situation! We were the worstest, most meanest parents ever! We explained to her that she did not fulfill her end of the bargain - The deal was that she helped her father with the dishes, and then she got a brownie. Since she didn’t help with the dishes, no brownie. End of the story.

“BUT THAT’S NOT FAIR! I did everything today! I helped outside and inside! SO, I DID ALL OF THAT FOR NOTHING!

In the end, we compromised with her, and gave her half a piece of a brownie.

And then it made me think, often in life, even as adults, we can work so hard on something only to be met with disappointment, and suddenly we conclude that all of it was for nothing.

We see this frequently in athletes who lose the championships, people going through a yucky divorce, interns who didn’t get the job position, students who didn’t get accepted into their dream schools, and clients who suddenly require surgery and can’t workout for 3-months.

Admittedly, I was a lot like this in my younger years. It’s why I started over so many times, why I quit so many times, why I had so many break ups, burnt bridges, and personal burn outs and depression.

I would find a new goal, cling to it, put all of my time and energy into it, and had an exact end result in mind. In my head, I was starting at A and expecting to reach Z. Life, however, does not work in alphabetical order. And, every time I did not reach Z, not only did I feel like a failure, but I also felt like I wasted all of my time and energy.

All of it was for nothing.

In hindsight (And especially now as a mother and coach), I realize how valuable all of those experiences were, and how much they have helped mold and shape me into who I am today. Without those experiences, I would not be who I am right now. Without those failures, detours, setbacks, and obstacles, I would not know resilience, grit, perseverance, success, and joy.

In CrossFit, I’ve experienced the “I did it all for nothing” feeling. When I started back in 2009, I quickly became competitive and tried to qualify for Regionals. I kept finishing in the top 100, barely missing qualifications. It was maddening. So, each year, I trained harder and longer. One year, I was actually in the top 50 and on my way to Regionals. The 4th week was in my wheelhouse - Power Cleans and Toes-to-Bar. I knew when the WOD was announced I was going to Regionals - This workout was going to seal the deal for me. However, that week, we had spring break in Hilton Head, so I had to plan accordingly to get it done at a local affiliate. No prob - I had it all figured out. What I DIDN’T expect, though, was to catch a stomach bug on the airplane ride over. In as little words as possible, I had stuff coming out of both ends, and without any control on my part. I had never been so sick in my life before. After three days of depletion, I tried to muster the energy to complete the WOD, but because my body was in such a deficit, I could barely finish one round. I watched all of my dreams crumble. I finished in like 800th place in that WOD, which obviously bumped me down a lot on the Leaderboard. I cried. A lot. And then I was angry - I did all of it for nothing!

But, let’s look at the big picture - While Regionals was my Z-point and I missed it, all of those things I did to try and get there gave me a TON of other invaluable gifts. I made a lot of friends along the way in local competitions, and connected with other affiliates. I gained a lot of self-confidence. I PR’d in every Open WOD (except the 4th one), and learned how to string together multiple ring muscle ups that year. I was the healthiest and fittest I had ever been in my life at just 9% body fat, no injuries or health conditions, and my nutrition was on-point! I had gained healthy habits and increased my quality of life as a coach, owner, mother, wife, and person. While I didn’t “kill it” in the Open, I was totally killin’ it in life!

It took me about 5 years to figure it out and learn this lesson, but I finally realized that I almost missed the best part of my journey. I almost missed out on all of the gifts I received along the way. Just like my daughter, I focused too much on the brownie, so when I didn’t get it, I pouted. I almost quit CrossFit at one point. Look at what I would be missing out on had I followed through on that.

While the “brownie treat” is an important part to motivation and goal-setting, it shouldn’t be the end all, be all. The brownie does NOT define and validate the journey. The brownie is NOT the destination. Death is our only destination, so until that day comes, brownies or not, it’s never “all for nothing.”

All of it, every single piece of it, the good, the bad, and the ugly, it’s ALL for learning and growing, and evolving into the best versions of ourselves through each stage of life.

When that next curveball comes (And yes, it will come if you get to live long enough), just KEEP SWINGING, my friends! ;-)

Kara PurvesComment
Fork It Friday: How to Choose a Protein Powder

There are SO many protein powders and marketing gimmicks out there, it can be challenging to know which one to get. I’m going to try to shed some light on this topic, and hopefully help y’all decode what’s in these protein powders.

First thing’s first, though - The best way to know if something is a good fit for you is simply to try it for a few weeks and see how you respond to it, physically and mentally.

Common sources of protein include: Whey, Casein, Soy, Beef Isolate, Eggs & Egg Whites, Pea, Hemp, Brown Rice, and mixed plants. For more information about each protein, check out this link:

https://www.healthline.com/nutrition/best-protein-powder#section8

Here’s a helpful article I found from the Cleveland Clinic:

Matching a Powder to Your Needs

With so many choices, how do you decide which protein powder is best for you? Here are some general guidelines, based on the outcomes you’re looking for:

  1. Build muscles — For muscle growth, choose a protein powder with a high biological value (a value that measures how well the body can absorb and utilize a protein). Whey protein and whey isolates are your best options.

  2. Lose weight — To lose weight, choose shakes with no added sugars or dextrins/maltodextrins (sweeteners made from starch). Don’t choose those with added branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), as they help promote muscle growth and weight gain.

  3. Stay vegetarian or vegan — If you are vegetarian or vegan, don’t choose milk-based protein shakes (e.g., whey, milk proteins); instead use 100 percent plant proteins.

  4. Go low-sugar with diabetes — Patients who have diabetes should choose protein shakes without added sugar (don’t choose protein powders with sugar listed as one of the first three ingredients). It’s also best to look for a shake that’s low in carbohydrates (less than 5 grams per serving).

  5. Limit protein for kidney disease — People with kidney disease can’t tolerate a lot of protein at one time. Stick with powders that have a lower-range protein content (10-15 grams per serving).

  6. Avoid gastrointestinal problems — Patients with irritable bowel syndrome or lactose intolerance should choose powders that don’t contain lactose sugars, artificial sweeteners or dextrins/maltodextrins. If you have a gluten allergy or sensitivity, don’t choose powders that contain gluten.

  7. Stick to your budget — To save money, buy tubs of protein powder instead of ready-to-drink protein shakes which are more expensive because they’re convenient.

  8. Get the most from your protein powder

    Here are a few things to consider:

    • To recover after exercise, an athlete or avid exerciser should consume protein within 60 minutes of a workout. That’s when your muscles are most responsive to the use of protein for the repair and growth process.

    • To control your weight, it’s best to consume a steady supply of protein at each meal and snack to help keep you full.

    Although there’s no magic number for how much protein to consume at one time, it’s best to aim for at least 3 ounces of protein per meal.

    Boost the Taste of Your Shakes

    Each protein powder has a unique taste, depending on the ingredients and protein source. A lot of companies use fillers or flavor enhancers designed by food scientists to create flavors beyond the standard vanilla, chocolate and strawberry.

    To improve the taste of the protein shakes you make, mix your protein powders with milk or a milk alternative (as opposed to water) to produce a creamier milkshake-like texture.

    Create your own flavor enhancers by mixing in one serving of fruit or even a tablespoon of peanut butter.

SOURCE: https://health.clevelandclinic.org/7-tips-choosing-best-protein-powder/

Kara PurvesComment
The Hammy & 5K Run - June 1st

HAVE Y’ALL SIGNED UP YET?!?!

We can scale, modify, and adapt for ANYONE, too, so don’t let that be an excuse for you! This is all about heart and soul, and giving your best with what you’ve got, and the event itself is for a great cause!

The HAMMY is an annual event brought to you by CrossFit Cadre to celebrate the life of Adam S. Hamilton.  The event is on June 1st, 2019 at the Kent State Dix Fieldhouse.

We start the day at 8:00 am with our national anthem and 5k. 

Workout heats are every 45 minutes starting at 8:00 am.  

All proceeds benefit the Adam S. Hamilton Memorial & Athletic Scholarship Fund.  Each year, two $10,000 scholarships are awarded to worthy Roosevelt High School seniors who have shown leadership in the classroom, on the playing fields and in the community. In addition to maintaining a 3.0 GPA and lettering in two sports.

Adam S. Hamilton

US Army Specialist Adam S. Hamilton, a native of Kent, Ohio, graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School in 2007. While in school, Adam was an All-American lacrosse player, the hockey career-goals record holder and played linebacker/wide receiver on the state-playoff football team.

Adam joined the US Army in 2009, graduated basic and advanced training and was proud to be a Cav scout of the 4th Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Brigade Combat Team in the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas. He was deployed to Afghanistan in February 2011.

On May 28, 2011, Adam died of wounds sustained from an improvised explosive device (IED) during a night mission in Haji Ruf, Afghanistan, at the age of 22. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medal.

He is survived by his parents Scott and Connie Hamilton and Nancy Krestan, brothers Brandon Hamilton and Nick Krestan and sisters Shawney and Taya Hamilton.

The Adam S. Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund was established to help carry on Adam’s legacy of service to the community. Each year, two $10,000 scholarships are awarded to worthy Roosevelt High School seniors who have shown leadership in the classroom, on the playing fields and in the community. In addition to maintaining a 3.0 GPA and lettering in two sports.

Donations to the scholarship fund may be sent to: The Adam S. Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund, 11783 Timber Pointe Trail, Mantua, Ohio 44255.

The HAMMY Workout

  • Row 1,000 Meters

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks
    (135 lbs. Men / 95 lbs Women)

  • 50 Push ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Sit ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Box Hops
    (24" Box Men / 20" Box Women)

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Pull Ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • Run 1000 Meters

*All Movements can be scaled

Individual:  Athletes (12 years and older) take on the workout as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

Teams of Two:  Athletes (Female/Male, Male/Male or Female/Female) split the workout with a partner as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

REGISTRATION LINK HERE:

https://www.thehammy.org/?fbclid=IwAR1_OqWVYaYjEGej0RgBhFdjeevMbQoO6Pbz9tZzbJ_sdXg5B77Kg-kdD5c

Kara PurvesComment
I Used to Be Able To...

I used to be able to do 10 unbroken strict ring muscle ups…

I used to be able to Clean & Jerk 200 pounds…

I used to be able to do a 2:34 Fran…

I used to be able to do weighted vest legless rope climbs…

I used to be able to Back Squat 275 pounds…

I also used to be able to hold my breath for 100m underwater, and swim a 24.88 in the 50 Freestyle.

I could spike a volleyball from the left-side into opponents’ faces, and I could sleep for 10 hours, and study for a test the period beforehand and ace it.

I used to be able to wake up at 8:00am and watch “Fraggle Rock” while eating Frosted Flakes out of a mixing bowl, and not have to count calories or worry about my waist size.

I used to be able to sprint against the boys on the playground, and not have to worry about pulling my hamstring.

I used to be able to use the bathroom in silence without kids walking in on me asking to open their fruit snacks.

I used to be able to just leave on a whim for a last-minute weekend getaway with my girlfriends.

I used to be able to cry in my mother’s arms, and her hugs and kisses would fix everything.

You see… The thing is, my friends, all of those “I used to be able to” statements aren’t meant to defeat and deflate us from who we are now. They are meant to be footprint, stepping stones, through our path of life, however long we are lucky to live it!

Often in CrossFit, especially the longer we get to do it, we inevitably will find ourselves in a “I used to be able to” stage of our fitness journey. Injuries, surgeries, setbacks, vacations, burn out, etc - They all happen to the best of us. Dude, life happens! It’s okay! The common “stuck in the mud” issue we find ourselves in when we return to the gym, though, is the invasive thought patterns of “I used to be able to…”

We suddenly appreciate the things we used to be able to do… You know, the things you used to belittle about yourself and say that’s all you could do at the time. “Oh, I can only do like 5 kipping pull ups. I can only Clean 95 pounds. I can barely muster 10 Double Unders.” Those kinds of things. Now that you can’t do what you used to, though, suddenly you wish you had it. Funny how that works, huh?!

The problem with this invasive thought pattern, though, is that it hinders us from starting over properly, and takes away from any progress you’ve made throughout your return. I’ve had to learn through THREE pregnancies and postpartums to allow myself to “start again.”

My first pregnancy, I was SO hard on myself, and my first year postpartum was really difficult mentally because I insulted all of my progress with, “Gosh, I USED to be able to lift more, do more, run faster…” I did not allow myself to be a postpartum athlete.

My second pregnancy, I was better, but still had some of the invasive thoughts. It’s a hard habit to break, y’all. This last pregnancy, though, I am actually enjoying my postpartum now. The first 4-5 months were rough due to postpartum depression and a difficult recovery physically, but today I am at a point where I can be healthy and fit and workout consistently, and I love it. I am enjoying my postpartum fitness journey because I am NOT worried about what I used to be able to do.

I am no longer a 12-year old soccer star. I am not a Varsity volleyball player anymore. I am not single and ready to mingle. I’m not in college. I am no longer a newly married late 20’s boss lady eager to take on the world with no kids.

I am an almost 39 year old mother of three girls with very different goals and priorities in life. I am sleep-deprived most of the time, and rely heavily on coffee, sarcasm, and cat-naps when possible to survive. I no longer wish to compete and be at an elite level, I just want to be functional.

So, as I approach my workouts today, I do so with a clean slate and a grateful heart. I am thankful for all of the things I used to be able to do. I am grateful to have been able to achieve them and have those experiences.

Now, it’s time to have NEW experiences!

The only way to enjoy and appreciate new experiences is to allow your old ones to be what they were and leave them there. Don’t bring them into your todays.

So, my friends, as you embark on your return to the gym, whether right now, a year from now, 5 years, 10 years, or even 50 years from now, regardless of the reason for the absence, allow yourself to begin a NEW fitness journey, and leave all of the “I used to be able to’s” behind.

As a coach, I don’t care what you used to be able to do. I care about what you’re going to do right now, right here. I care that you give your best with what you have right now. I care about the person you choose to be now, and tomorrow. I care about the actions you decide to take next.

No more “I used to be able to,” let’s start saying, “I can do this,” and “I am going to do that,” and “I want to be able to do…”

Say it with me - I am going to be the best version of myself today!

Kara PurvesComment
Soreness vs Pain

Sometimes, it’s hard to tell if we are just really sore from a workout, or if we actually injured something. Often we think of pain as a bad thing, and yes, while injuries do suck, pain is a wonderful thing because it tells us when to stop and what not to do! So, listen to pain, don’t ignore it.

But, how do we tell the difference, because soreness and pain can feel identical. Especially if we are new to CrossFit, or learned a new movement, maybe we increased our volume, or just came back from a long vacation or surgery.

Let’s compare the two…

SORENESS can feel tender to the touch, tired or burning-feeling during exercise, dull, generalized, and can feel tight and achy after the workout. PAIN feels sharp during and/or after the workout. Like you’re being stabbed with a knife - ouch!

Now, sometimes super sore muscles can feel sharp, right?! Especially if you’re brand new to CrossFit. The big difference is in the length of time you feel the soreness or pain - SORENESS only lasts for about 2-3 days. PAIN will linger past 3 days, though, especially if it’s not addressed properly!

SORENESS improves and can even goes away completely with warm up, mobility, stretching, and during the next workout. PAIN will get WORSE with movement and prevent you from continuing on in the workout.

SORENESS worsens from sitting and standing still for long periods of time. PAIN will worsen with continued activity.

SORENESS is more generalized in location, whereas PAIN is specific and you can point to it.

SORENESS is just muscle(s), whereas PAIN is more specific to a muscle and/or joint.

So, what do we do if it’s sore muscles?! KEEP MOVING! ;-) Yes, it’s actually better to come in the next day and do an active recovery workout than to stay home and sit still. Stretch, mobilize, go for a walk around your neighborhood, do some yoga, whatever. Movement is your friend when you have sore muscles.

Now, what if you actually have pain?! CALL YOUR DOCTOR!

When in doubt, get it checked out!

And, until you’ve gotten your pain properly diagnosed and treated, definitely stop doing any and all movements that aggravate it! Remember that the beautiful thing about CrossFit is that we can scale, modify, and adapt EVERYTHING! ;-)

I bring all of this up because last week I somehow injured my left tricep. Definitely pain, as I can point to the specific area it hurts, and it is sharp and gets much worse with movement. Boo! I actually don’t know how I did it, I just woke up one morning with it… I guess this is what my parents were talking about when I was a young whipper snapper. Ha!

Anyway, despite having a mysterious pain/injury, I’ve still been coming in every day at 9:00am to workout with class. Modifying doesn’t suck - Our attitude about modifying sucks. I’ve still been getting in great workouts without using my left tricep. It’s actually like a fun, challenging game to figure out what I can and can’t do. I can’t do any pushing/pressing movements, and I can only row or ring row gently. Otherwise, any other movements with my arms can only be either an overhead position, or a farmer carry.

So, for today’s WOD, instead of:

3 RFT
15 HSPU
15 Cal Row
15 C2B Pull ups
15 Cal Row

I subbed everything and did:

3 RFT
15 OHS @ 65
200m Run
15 Ring Rows w/ false grip
200m Run

Soreness you can work through. Pain you CANNOT work through - You gotta work around it. Pay attention, listen to the signs, ask the coach if you’re unsure, and as I said before, “When in doubt, get it checked out!”

Happy Training, friends!

Kara PurvesComment
Spring is in the Air

The weather is starting to finally turn, and before we know it, summer will be here!

So, now that warmer weather and sunny days are ahead, here are some friendly reminders for y’all to consider as you head in for a workout:

  • Wear clothes that wick sweat and moisture away from your body to keep you cool. NO COTTON, especially not cotton socks and underwear!

  • Dress in layers. Especially if you’re a morning athlete, you may be cold initially, but be sure to have a shirt or tank top on underneath. You may even want to wear shorts, and just put on lightweight sweats for the beginning.

  • DRINK WATER consistently and stay hydrated. Remember that hydration is NOT something you can “make up” quickly by chugging a gallon of water suddenly. Drink morning, noon, afternoon, and night.

  • Whenever possible, get your workout done in the morning when it’s cooler, especially in the summer time.

  • Listen to your body. Scale and modify as needed, and even slow down as needed, especially in the heat.

  • Did I say DRINK WATER already?! ;-) Yes, it’s really important. Stay hydrated, my friends!

  • Bring an extra shirt or tank top to change into after the workout. More than likely, you’ll be super sweaty, and it’s always nice to have a clean, dry top to change into after a serious sweat sesh!

  • Stay on top of your hand-care game, especially when it gets really hot and humid around here! That kind of weather makes our calluses more susceptible to ripping and tearing.

Got any other helpful tips for us to share?!

Kara PurvesComment
He's Our Hero!

Tonight, we want to give a shout out to our fearless leader and co-owner of CrossFit Cadre, Coach Jason Welch, for completing his first-ever GORUCK Challenge this weekend. It was a 24-hour mental and physical challenge that took place in Edgewater State Park.

As many of you know, Coach Jason already has enough on his plate as it is working full-time as an anesthetist, is a busy father of three, loving husband, business owner of CrossFit Cadre, as well as a friend, mentor, community outreach, volunteer, and giver. He heads on The Hammy and The Winter Classic events. He answers all of our calls, texts, emails, Facebook messages, and posts. He puts out fires. Aaaand, pretty much never sleeps! ;-)

And, even despite all of his great doings day in and day out, this guy STILL makes the time to do a GORUCK Challenge and put himself out there. How can you not love a man who not only preaches self-improvement and going outside your zones, but a man who also LIVES by his words!

Here’s what Coach Jason had to say today on Facebook:

Really can’t put into words what this patch means to me! Toughest thing I’ve EVER done and it STILL pales in comparison to what POW’s endured during the Bataan Death March. Although physically demoralizing, this challenge was MENTAL! Just kept telling myself to put one foot in front of the other to get to the end. This was only 24 hours of my life and I had many creature comforts to help me along. Can’t imagine being 98lbs., with malaria, dehydrated, vomiting and soiling myself. Add to that the threat of a bayonet, sword or a bullet if you stopped! Massive respect for those who served and for those who serve with with focused resolve. Thank you to all who called, text or reached out with encouragement.

Congrats, Coach Jason! WE ARE SO PROUD OF YOU!!!

Kara PurvesComment
Fork It Friday: To Organic or Not

Organic foods are usually pretty great for the environment, but can also be a little rough on our wallets. Sometimes, the prices are much bigger, especially with things like milk and eggs. So, is it worth buying or organic or not?

It depends. Sometimes it is. Other times, it’s not necessary to spend the extra money.

First, let’s talk about what the word “organic” even means in the grocery store. The term refers to how the food is grown, handled, and processed. The government has strict standards for its “USDA Organic” seal: “Produce must be grown without the use of most conventional pesticides, fertilizers that aren’t naturally made, sewage sludge, radiation, and genetically modified organisms. Animals can’t be given antibiotics or hormones. “

Labels can be deceiving, even with organic products, so read carefully. “100% Organic” means that all of the ingredients are certified organic. “Organic” by itself means that at least 95% is certified organic (which means the other 5% could be anything…). “Made With Organic Ingredients” means that at least 70% is certified organic (leaving 30% to be questioned).

Be wary of marketing labels, like “All-Natural” and “Farm-Raised” and “Natural Flavors” and “Free Range.” Those are NOT regulated, nor certified, and are simply marketing gimmicks to get you to spend more money.

Now, here’s another thing to know about organic foods. Organic does NOT mean it is necessarily pesticide-free. While organic farmers cannot use synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, they CAN apply ones that are made from natural ingredients. However, if your diet includes a wide variety of produce, you are much less likely to get a big dose of any one specific pesticide.

Okay, so the most important question.

WHAT IS WORTH BUYING ORGANIC?!

BEEF

POULTRY

PORK

MICROWAVE POPCORN (Yes, seriously)

ANYTHING WITHOUT SKIN THAT YOU PEEL - Strawberries, blueberries, lettuce, etc. And definitely be sure to thoroughly rinse any produce before eating, even organic produce! No need to use any special cleansers, just running water will do.

What you probably do not need to spend extra on, and can skip the “organic” label on:

SEAFOOD - Buy conventional. The USDA actually does not have organic standards for seafood, so instead, pick ones that are low in mercury, like shrimp and salmon. Don’t fall for the labels on seafood - “organic” and “farm raised” are not guarantees with seafood, so more than likely you could be paying a heavier price for a meaningless label.

ANYTHING WITH SKIN THAT YOU PEEL - So, things like avocados, bananas, pineapples, and melons.

MAPLE SYRUP - Just be sure to buy “100% Maple Syrup”

If possible, buy your food, especially produce, locally from a farmer. Produce like apples, nectarines, strawberries, peaches, kale, spinach, lettuce, etc. The Farmer’s Market will be starting up again! ;-)

And, at the end of the day - You do what YOU feel is best for you! If you want to buy all organic, rock on! If you don’t, or you cannot afford it, just be mindful of the ingredients and wash them well before enjoying!

Happy Friday!

Kara PurvesComment
How Life Works

Tonight’s blog is a heavy topic, and very personal. However, I share it with an intended message that I hope you receive well.

A common question I get asked is how did I get into fitness and coaching. A legit and obvious question clients would ask me, right?

I have been active all my life. Being the youngest of four kids, I followed in my older siblings’ footsteps. Swimming, soccer, volleyball, ballet, basketball, and anything in between. In college, I gained the Freshman 15 (plus another 30). Then, I found triathlons, which became my new obsession. Around this time in my very young adulthood, my father was diagnosed with Diabetes Type II. He had always been overweight in my childhood. He was raised on milk, sourdough bread, lots of salt, pizza, chips, soda pop, meat and potatoes.

Over the years, I watched my father go through health issue after health issue after health issue, and all the while, my mother and sister desperately trying to save him. They meal prepped for him, portion-sized for him, took him on walks, checked his blood sugar, got his meds, and were basically at-home nurses. And yet, surprise, surprise, here we are in 2019, and my father still has Type II. A disease that can be cured with proper nutrition and a healthy lifestyle.

Early on in this journey, I was mad at my father for not taking ownership and changing. It made me go into a hyperactive level of fitness. I became overly obsessed, and in hindsight, I realize I was overcompensating for my father, and projecting my hurt feelings and fears.

Then, I found CrossFit in 2009, and was all in. When I became a coach and we opened our own gym in 2011, I was on a mission to save the world.  If I couldn’t save my father, I was bound and determined to save everyone else.

Then… One day, my brother came home to my parent’s house and we learned a devastating reality he had been secretly living for years. My brother is an alcoholic. His long-term girlfriend finally had enough and kicked him out, so he found himself at our parent’s footsteps with nothing.

And again, here we are in 2019, and my brother is still an alcoholic living in my parent’s house. It set me into warp-speed overdrive. Not only can I not save my father, but I can’t save my brother. Double whammy.

This must be how Batman felt in the “Dark Knight” when he failed to save Rachel Dawes.

I coached so hard, and I preached even harder. The problem was, I was too self-righteous and blinded by my own pain for my father and brother, and I was using my clients as compensation tools.

I was too much.

So, here we are, again in 2019, and my father and brother are still exactly where they were 10, 15 years ago, but I am very different. I no longer chase my clients and try to force change. I no longer hold their hand and do it for them. I no longer over-train and stress over my nutrition. And, I no longer carry the burden of my father and brother anymore.

We only change when we want to. When we have to. When we’re ready to do the dirty work. When it’s more important to us than all of our excuses and bullsh** stories. Unfortunately, not everyone reaches that point.

The other thing is, nothing is guaranteed. How ironic would it be if both my father and brother outlived me, and I died suddenly of a heart attack?! It could very well happen, despite my good health and fitness.

It took my father and brother for me to learn the simple, but hard truth –

You can’t save anyone. And, no one can save you. You have to save yourself.

It has to be an inside job. Your mom, your BFF, your husband, your doctor, your coach, and even your assistant can only take you so far. You have to carry yourself the rest of the way.

“If you give a man a fish, you feed him for a day. If you teach a man to fish, you feed him for life.” There is another crucial part to this quote, though. The man has to WANT to fish and do it for himself in order to live. My father and brother are not picking up the fishing poles, and I can’t force them to.

It was a difficult process for me to learn to accept this. Just because I wanted my father to eat healthy and exercise, doesn’t mean he wants to, nor that he has to. I’ve had to learn to be able to just sit on the dock with my father and enjoy his company, despite his lack of “fishing.” I am still working on being able to sit on the dock with my brother.

My heavy heart shares this to let you know – Life only works if YOU do!

Cast away, my friends.

And, when you get the choice to sit it out or dance… I hope you dance!

Kara PurvesComment
Why We HAVE to Squat Differently

When you have a spare 5 minutes, I would love for you to read this article by Dr. Ryan DeBell. He owns and operates “The Movement Fix” and is definitely worth following him on YouTube, Instagram, and Facebook. Lots of knowledge bombs and perspectives!

This article in particular went viral a few years back, and is one of my all-time favorites. I refer to it often with clients, because there is a common misconception that there is a “right way” to squat. The cookie-cutter version - Knees out, feet shoulder-width apart, feet foward, chest up - That is a good place to start.

However, with a good coach, you should be finding YOUR right squat. The way I squat is not how I would try to force a 6’7” man. I am 5’4” on a good day, and I have short, thick Asian legs that were designed for squatting. A lanky 6’7” man whose torso is short, and legs stretched over a mile physically cannot squat like me. Nor does he need to squat like me to get strong and fit. He needs to squat in HIS best stance for his body type and ability.

Okay, so check out this article:

https://themovementfix.com/the-best-kept-secret-why-people-have-to-squat-differently/

Kara PurvesComment
More Cowbell

When my husband, Spencer, and I were still just dating, we were training for a triathlon together and often went on long bike rides through the breathtaking back roads of Marin County. We were also big fans of the Tour de France and loved the use of cowbells to cheer on the cyclists, especially through the tough terrain and finish lines.

So, we got a cowbell and carried it around in our car so that at any given time, if we happened to drive by a cyclist or runner on the road, we would cowbell them on. It was always a great surprise to them to hear the bell and realize we were cheering them on, and made Spencer and I feel like we were spreading a little bit of love into the fitness world.

At our wedding, one of our party favors was a cowbell.

You see… We need more cowbell in the world.

The other day, I saw a well-intended Facebook video challenging everyone to see how many burpees they could do in one minute. The video was a woman trying her best in her living room. It was a valiant effort. Out of curiosity (And, an ever so slight hope for humanity), I read the comments. Without fail, the very FIRST one was, “And no burpees were done that day. Maybe she should learn how to do it correctly!”

I kept scrolling… Hoping to find at least ONE positive comment.

“Her form is sh**. Why would you guys post such a crappy video?!”

“NOT how you do burpees. Those suck. Zero score for her!”

“WTF?! That’s what you call a burpee? I could do 100 of those in a minute!”

“She looks like a dying dolphin.”

“I bet she learned how to those at CrossFit.”

And… It went on… And on… Although a tiny few did try to stick up for her and say something nice, they were quickly muted by the trolls and haters.

From a coach’s standpoint, her burpees were safe, meaning, she moved mostly well under intensity and did not do anything dangerous or unsafe in the video that I would have stopped her for. Her burpees and her efforts were legit for fitness!

Now, if she were in the CrossFit Open and I were her judge, then I would have to correct her to meet the Open standards. She didn’t clap at the top, and her hips did not fully extend at the top (Almost, though). These are Open standards, though. She wasn’t in the Open. She was in a random video promoting general fitness, and trying to engage the world in a fun 1-minute challenge.

A common tendency I see in fitness is when someone finds something that works for them, and they work really hard at it and take pride in it, they tend to project that on to others and go off on a self-righteous rampage telling others “how it should be done.”

I hate to say it, but many CrossFitters have this disease. We see a video on social media, and we want to “correct” them and “no rep” them. I hate to say it even more… I was once one of those guys early on in my CrossFit journey.

Okay, friends, so here’s the thing - WE NEED MORE COWBELL

And a heck of a lot less judgement, “correcting,” ridicule, and shaming. Your “standards” for a burpees are not the only way. The CrossFit Open & Games standards are NOT “right,” nor are they the Bible. Just like any other sport, there have to be specific standards to make expectations and achievements equal and fair. In general fitness, though, we just need to move well, move safe, and do our best efforts.

We need more cheering. More support. More high fives. More benefit of the doubt. More love.

Imagine how much easier it would be for all of us to achieve our health & fitness goals if the world was cheering us on, versus judging us!

Go get a cowbell. Leave it in your car. Surprise a stranger. Spread the love!

More cowbell! :-)

Kara PurvesComment
Improvement Imminent

Our head honchos, Coach JonMichael & Coach Philip, of our programming “Improvement Imminent” have now started an Instagram account, so be sure to follow them @improvement_imminent

They will be sharing video demos and photos on moving well, body position, and understanding our mechanics. Quality over quantity is the name of the game. Lots of great content to come, so be sure to Follow them, and let us know what you’d like them to discuss, share, demo, etc.

And, if you aren’t already, be sure to listen to their weekly podcast on SoundCloud - Follow Coach Philip Weigel for the Improvement Imminent podcasts explaining the week’s workouts and intentions, how to execute and scale appropriately, and other helpful information.

CHECK IT OUT HERE: https://soundcloud.com/philip-weigel-520850188

Life only works if you do! ;-)

Kara PurvesComment
Confessions of a CrossFit Coach

I am about to share my own confessions as a CrossFit coach with the intention to connect and relate to y’all, and hopefully make any of you realize that we are just as human as the next. While I can coach an athlete to an elite level, I can’t coach myself. I need the push just as much as any athlete. And, while I can train and educate anyone into positive lifestyle changes, I slip up and fall into slumps and runts, too.

I just got back from a week-long spring break family vacay in Hilton Head, and while I did run five days in a row, and completed a few sets of push ups, air squats, and sit ups, I also drank some Pina Coladas, margaritas, and beer. I ate too much seafood, devoured all the chips and salsa, and enjoyed some ice cream and other treats along the way. I sat on the beach for hours. Dude, I enjoyed my vacation!

The big takeaway is that I didn’t go overboard.

I didn’t binge and overdo it. I did just enough that my tummy bulged just a bit, my heart was happy, memories were made, and I wasn’t sick to my stomach, no headaches, and no hangovers, and most definitely no ragrets! ;-)

At least two or three times a year, I totally cherry-pick a WOD. No shame. I own it.

Ladies, I still catch myself from time to time comparing myself to y’all. Sometimes, I question my value as a coach on the basis of the size of my Lululemon pants. I still get insecure about certain movements, certain benchmarks, certain lifts, and even certain parts of my body. And yes, I have even wondered if you, or you, or even you actually like me.

At the same time, I have learned that the more I work on being a skillful coach and a consistent athlete, the better I can do my job and function in life, regardless of anyone’s opinions of me. And, the more I work on myself, the more it seems to attract the right clients who want to work on themselves, too!

While I love burpees, I do actually hate wall balls, rowing, snatch, and thrusters. And, I hate them because they are really hard for me to do, and it takes A LOT of strength both physically AND mentally for me to do them. Over the years, I have learned to tolerate them, but alas, a love affair is most likely out of the question for us, and that is okay.

Even though there are things I actually hate in CrossFit (and yes, I do genuinely hate them, so I totally get it when y’all vent about a movement), I have learned to still do them despite my own issues. You don’t HAVE to like a movement to be able to do it well and get better at it. I realize the fitness benefits of the wall ball and rowing, so I just suck it up when the time is needed.

My weight and body have fluctuated many, many times throughout my life. I’ve weighed over 200 lbs before, and I’ve been 115 lbs. I’ve been 9% body fat, and 29%. I’ve been a size 14 pant and a size 2.

I’ve done the 100% Paleo diet challenge. Many times. I’ve done cleanses before. I’ve tried the apple cider vinegar diet (yikes). I’ve taken diet pills. I’ve tried Keto, Atkins, South Beach, and even Slim Fast.

I’ve tried kickboxing, Zuumba, cycling, personal training, Olympic lifting, water aerobics, Pilates, Barre, triathlons, long-distance running, and of course, CrossFit.

I’ve trained 6 days a week, 3-4 hours a day. I’ve also quit and been sedentary for over two years.

I’ve been self-motivated and on top of the world. I’ve also been depressed and hit rock bottom.

I’ve been a winner. I’ve also been a loser.

You see… I am a coach of many experiences, and while education is just as important, I’ve realized through all of my experiences in health and fitness that there is no ONE right way. There are, however, a lot of wrong ways, and I’ve done many of them.

My friends, you are not broken and alone.

You are not supposed to fit into a certain size, weigh a specific weight, fit into specific clothes. You are not required to eat a certain diet, buy a specific protein shake, or wear a cool brand name. You don’t have to achieve a specific “Fran” time, Deadlift a certain weight, or run a set mile time in order to be fit. You are not supposed to post only highlighted reels of your meal prep days and workouts on Instagram, and then shamefully hide behind closed doors when you have a bowl of ice cream or skip a workout. You don’t need chiseled abs to be worth something. Your “Fight Gone Bad” score does not define you.

You can totally sit with us.

You were never meant to be anything other than YOU.

Once I realized that my own health and fitness was MY decision, and NOT the multi-billion dollar industry, my entire existence became whole and meaningful. I was finally in control of myself.

And, to my own surprise, I then became the MOST healthy and fit I have ever been in my life!

And, yes, I still make mistakes and still need coaching and support from time to time, just like any other normal human being. A common misconception about coaches is that just because we are great at what we do, then we must be great at doing it ourselves. Coaching and doing are two different things. This is why an exceptional athlete does not actually always make a great coach.

The more human I can be with y’all, though, the better I can coach, train, and live life.

We are not meant to be perfect. We are meant to improve.

Kara PurvesComment
The Hammy & 5k Run

The HAMMY is an annual event brought to you by CrossFit Cadre to celebrate the life of Adam S. Hamilton.  The event is on June 1st, 2019 at the Kent State Dix Fieldhouse.

We start the day at 8:00 am with our national anthem and 5k. 

Workout heats are every 45 minutes starting at 8:00 am.  

All proceeds benefit the Adam S. Hamilton Memorial & Athletic Scholarship Fund.  Each year, two $10,000 scholarships are awarded to worthy Roosevelt High School seniors who have shown leadership in the classroom, on the playing fields and in the community. In addition to maintaining a 3.0 GPA and lettering in two sports.

Adam S. Hamilton

US Army Specialist Adam S. Hamilton, a native of Kent, Ohio, graduated from Theodore Roosevelt High School in 2007. While in school, Adam was an All-American lacrosse player, the hockey career-goals record holder and played linebacker/wide receiver on the state-playoff football team.

Adam joined the US Army in 2009, graduated basic and advanced training and was proud to be a Cav scout of the 4th Squadron, 4th Cavalry, 1st Brigade Combat Team in the 1st Infantry Division at Fort Riley, Kansas. He was deployed to Afghanistan in February 2011.

On May 28, 2011, Adam died of wounds sustained from an improvised explosive device (IED) during a night mission in Haji Ruf, Afghanistan, at the age of 22. He was posthumously awarded the Bronze Star and Army Commendation Medal.

He is survived by his parents Scott and Connie Hamilton and Nancy Krestan, brothers Brandon Hamilton and Nick Krestan and sisters Shawney and Taya Hamilton.

The Adam S. Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund was established to help carry on Adam’s legacy of service to the community. Each year, two $10,000 scholarships are awarded to worthy Roosevelt High School seniors who have shown leadership in the classroom, on the playing fields and in the community. In addition to maintaining a 3.0 GPA and lettering in two sports.

Donations to the scholarship fund may be sent to: The Adam S. Hamilton Memorial Academic & Athletic Scholarship Fund, 11783 Timber Pointe Trail, Mantua, Ohio 44255.

The HAMMY Workout

  • Row 1,000 Meters

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks
    (135 lbs. Men / 95 lbs Women)

  • 50 Push ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Sit ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Box Hops
    (24" Box Men / 20" Box Women)

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • 50 Pull Ups

  • 7 Squat, Clean 'n Jerks

  • Run 1000 Meters

*All Movements can be scaled

Individual:  Athletes (12 years and older) take on the workout as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

Teams of Two:  Athletes (Female/Male, Male/Male or Female/Female) split the workout with a partner as prescribed or with the weight and scaled movements of their choice.

REGISTRATION LINK HERE:

https://www.thehammy.org/?fbclid=IwAR1_OqWVYaYjEGej0RgBhFdjeevMbQoO6Pbz9tZzbJ_sdXg5B77Kg-kdD5c

Kara PurvesComment
Hand Care for CrossFitters

Ok, now let’s talk about our hands.

We’ve seen the social media posts before… The bloody hands with a caption saying something like, “Murph for the first-time. Hands destroyed! Rite of passage complete!”

I will fully disclose that I’ve done it before, too. My first year of CrossFit and I tore in Fran when I did it the first time “Rx” and I was so proud of myself. My coach at the time, though… Not so proud of me. I remember it like it was yesterday. I showed him my hands with a silly grin on my face, and all he said to me was, “And now you have an injury to deal with that you could have easily prevented.” At the time, I was disappointed by his response, but today, I totally get it.

You DO NOT need to rip and tear your hands! Not even in “Murph.”

Ripping and tearing is NOT a rite of passage in CrossFit. It does NOT make you badass. And, no, ripping and tearing is NOT normal and should not happen often.

Just say no to ripping and tearing.

Alright, now we have to cleared, how do we take care of our hands?!

  1. Keep them moisturized DAILY - The worst thing for your hands is to let them get super dry and cracked. This is especially challenging during our winter months, so you have to be diligent. One trick I learned from my mom long ago is to rub good ol’ fashioned Vaseline on your hands (and anywhere else you need lotion) right after you shower, and BEFORE you towel dry. So, yes, while you are still wet, rub the Vaseline on like lotion, and then gently towel-dry.

  2. SHAVE YOUR CALLUSES - This was something that I just didn’t know to do until I randomly saw a guy doing it one day at a competition. You don’t know what you don’t know. He showed me his tool and how to do it, and it’s changed my life! You can get them at almost any CVS, Walmart, or Walgreens, or any drug store, and most definitely on Amazon. Shave your calluses about once a week. You want it so that your hand is smooth when you rub your fingers across your palm (no bumps).

  3. “The Chaser” - Pedi Egg - If you still have some bumps on your hands after shaving, the Pedi Egg is pretty awesome to follow with.

That’s it. It’s pretty straightforward. And, simple. You just have to be consistent with it, and keep your hands healthy, and you won’t rip. I haven’t ripped since 2010, and I don’t wear any hand protectors or tape.

And, if you are about to tear in the middle of a workout, while it is certainly your choice to take the chance or not, I would encourage you to modify and save your hands. If you’re doing pull ups and your hand is about to rip, then switch to ring rows. Consider the risk vs. reward factor. Is it worth ripping your hands?! Or, do you need your hands to be able to do other things later on?!

Now… If you do happen to rip, then be sure to carefully remove any excess skin and skin flaps, and then wash your hands in warm water with salt. Yeah…it hurts…but, it helps a lot. Don’t cover up the wounds with bandages. Keep them open and just rub a little bit of Neosporin on them. Keep it lubricated. Keep it clean. And, obviously, don’t do any movements that irritate the wounds!

Happy Hands! :-)

Kara PurvesComment